What Does The Idiom Fit As A Fiddle Mean?

Why do we say fit as a fiddle?

The violin was picked out as the exemplar because of the alliteration of fit and fiddle, and because the violin is a beautifully shaped instrument producing a very particular sound.

But then fit came to mean ‘in good physical shape’ and so fit as a fiddle came to mean ‘in good condition physically’..

What does the idiom finger in the pie mean?

Meaning. The full phrase is usually “To have a finger in every pie”. Someone who has a finger in every pie is involved in a lot of different activities or knows about a lot of different things. This idiom can be used positively, to show that someone is energetic and has varied skills and interests.

What does the idiom black sheep mean?

In the English language, black sheep is an idiom used to describe an odd or disreputable member of a group, especially within a family.

What is the meaning of the idiom play second fiddle?

To play a supporting or minor role in relation to someone else: “Tired of playing second fiddle, she resigned and started her own company.” In an orchestra, the position of second violinist (fiddle) is not as glamorous as that of first violinist.

Where is the red kale Dragon Quest 11?

Head into the First Forest and from the Summit Campsite, head south and drop down into the hollowed out tree. Take a left here and head into the north corner to spot a large tree with a golden Sparkly Spot under it containing the Red Kale.

What does metaphor mean?

A metaphor is a figure of speech that describes an object or action in a way that isn’t literally true, but helps explain an idea or make a comparison. … A metaphor states that one thing is another thing. It equates those two things not because they actually are the same, but for the sake of comparison or symbolism.

Is Break a leg an idiom?

“Break a leg” is a typical English idiom used in the context of theatre or other performing arts to wish a performer “good luck”. …

What does get to the bottom mean?

: to find out the true reason for or cause of (something) Police are working furiously to get to the bottom of this recent string of violent crimes.

What is another word for how are you?

10 other (informal) ways to say “How are you?” How are you doing? How have you been? How’s everything?

Are you fit as a fiddle?

The phrase “fit as a fiddle” is a simile that means being in good health; something that’s in sound condition. Example: After a routine health check up with his local physician, Jeremy’s doctor concluded that he was healthy. In other words, he was as fit as a fiddle.

What does the idiom down in the mouth mean?

or down at the mouth. Informal. depressed; unhappy; discouraged.

The most common English idiomsIdiomMeaningSpeak of the devilThe person we were just talking about showed up!That’s the last strawMy patience has run outThe best of both worldsAn ideal situationTime flies when you’re having funYou don’t notice how long something lasts when it’s fun33 more rows

How would you use fit as a fiddle in a sentence?

Examples:My grandfather is 90 years old, but he is as fit as a fiddle.She had fallen very ill, but with rest and medication, she is now fit as a fiddle.The team had partied late into the night, but on match day, each of them was as fit as a fiddle.After a refreshing vacation by the sea, I now feel fit as a fiddle.More items…

What does idiom really mean?

1 : an expression in the usage of a language that is peculiar to itself either in having a meaning that cannot be derived from the conjoined meanings of its elements (such as up in the air for “undecided”) or in its grammatically atypical use of words (such as give way)

What does the idiom jump to conclusions mean?

Jumping to conclusions (officially the jumping conclusion bias, often abbreviated as JTC, and also referred to as the inference-observation confusion) is a psychological term referring to a communication obstacle where one “judge[s] or decide[s] something without having all the facts; to reach unwarranted conclusions”.

Where does the saying on the fiddle come from?

Being on the fiddle means being corrupt or getting more than you should from the system. It is a nautical term which refers to the raised edges of the square dinner plates used on board ships. The raised edges (known as fiddles) prevented the food from sliding or rolling off during rough seas.

What does fill the bill mean?

or to fill the bill. phrase. If you say that someone or something fits the bill or fills the bill, you mean that they are suitable for a particular job or purpose.